How men matter for gender parity

By Professor Elisabeth Kelan

The rarity of women in senior leadership positions is regularly lamented. It is now well understood that a key problem lies in the so-called feeder pipeline for leadership positions where women often get stuck. However changing this pipeline requires organisational cultures to change. Culture change can only happen if gender change initiatives not only focus on women; they must engage men. Men form the majority of leaders in organisations and as such have a central role to play when it comes...

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Male middle managers must see gender equality as business

By Professor Elisabeth Kelan

It is often presumed that the lack of women in senior positions is, at least in part, due to the lack of female role models. While role models are clearly important for women and men aspiring to leadership roles, just arguing for more role models for women is not going to be enough to increase the number of women in leadership roles. Instead we need to ensure that men (as well as women) become role models for gender equality and gender inclusive leadership.

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Vacancy at the top: just one in five organisations are prepared

By Professor Emma Parry

It’s a familiar sight. Time and again, organisations are caught out by the sudden departure of senior leaders, and forced to scrabble to find replacements. In the meantime, of course, the organisation drifts, rudderless, while recruiters and directors struggle to fill the gap. Succession planning? You’d think the concept had never been invented.

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Innovation in difficult times

By Professor Keith Goffin

There are always difficult times—for the economy as a whole, for individual industries or sectors of the economy, or for individual companies (and not forgetting Brexit). And in such difficult times, concentrating on current business and reducing investments in innovative projects is the natural response. Even so, cutting back or cancelling innovation projects must be a measure of last resort.

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Employee satisfaction surveys: putting employee well-being on the organisational development agenda

By Dr Noeleen Doherty

Back in 2012, the Office for National Statistics published the results of its first ‘happiness survey’. The—perhaps unsurprising—result: people who are married, have jobs, and own their own homes are the most likely to be satisfied with their lives. Living in an unemployment ‘black spot’, being middle-aged, and being unhealthy, all correlated with being unhappy.

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Mindfulness: the mental muscle that boosts employee performance

By Dr Jutta Tobias

At Cranfield, we teach—and research—mindfulness. You’re perhaps surprised by that: undeniably, mindfulness has become popularly associated with New Age alternative beliefs and Zen Buddhism. But supposing mindfulness turned out to be associated with employee and organisational performance? Very probably, your opinion of mindfulness might then change.

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